Review: Eric Olafson, Space Pirate by Vanessa Ravencroft

33142375Audiobook Title: Eric Olafson, Space Pirate
Author: Vanessa Ravencroft
Publisher: Inkitt
Release Date: Mar. 11, 2017

It’s the year 5021 and the Milky Way Galaxy is teeming with life and exotic species. The majority of the known civilizations have formed a multi-cultural mega organization called the United Stars of Galaxies. This Union is protected by the brave men and women of the United Stars Space fleet against external threats.

Eric Olafson, born and raised under harsh conditions of the traditional and inward looking society of Nilfeheim, left his planet to fulfill his dreams of becoming a Starship captain.

When Eric gets kidnaped by an unknown organization and brought to Sin4, he slowly starts to discover his central role in an ancient conflict of cosmic proportions.

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Review

I have to admit, I had an extremely hard time getting into Eric Olafson, Space Pirate. It was clear from the start of the book that I was entering an already well-established world and storyline in the very middle. I was immediately overwhelmed by a tirade of different characters by name and possibly their species without much description and foreign objects with names that seemed like they were spelled by typing with my nose. Because of this, I found the beginning of the story extremely hard to grasp. I felt like I was standing outside of an inside joke in a way. While I’m a big fan of series, I think it’s helpful or even important, especially when there is time between the publications of books or if a book within the series can be read as a standalone, that there be a bit more of an introduction or reintroduction to the story. There was a brief prologue to Eric Olafson’s past, but not much when it came to the immediate danger he found himself in from page one.

While I’m a big fan of series, I think it’s helpful or even important, especially when there is time between the publications of books or if a book within the series can be read as a standalone, that there be a bit more of an introduction or reintroduction to the story. There was a brief prologue to Eric Olafson’s past, but not much when it came to the immediate danger he found himself in from page one.

It was very hard to conjure any attachment to the many characters in this book. The transitions between characters were somewhat sloppy and I found myself have to read the same paragraph over and over to make sure I knew exactly who or what was being talked about. It was also difficult to picture many of these characters, even after finding out who or what they were; sort of like being told a story by a friend who constantly uses the name of someone you’ve never met, but only know through second-hand tellings. Really, what I needed was a illustrated roster so I knew who everyone was.

The most difficult thing for me while reading was the constant naming of places, organizations, objects and other things not normally found in my every day Tucsonan life that I just couldn’t figure out. I was unsure about a lot of the things there were mentioned since they just weren’t described at all, but this could also just stem from the fact that I haven’t read anything previous to this book where I’m sure the answer to all of my issues lies. However, even with my lack of knowledge, my mind slowly pieced together this science fiction world, even if I didn’t fully understand it. It was clear to me that there was a complexity this world.

What I did find interesting was Eric’s alter ego of Freya, his ultra-feminine side that can apparently out strut me in high heels. I had a hard time deciphering if this was a true attempt at a transgender character or merely added for shock value. To me, Eric’s Freya came off as more or a persona or character, maybe trying to toe the lines of androgyny or gender fluidity, than resulting from any real internal struggle other than a need to be different. I would have loved to have seen this developed more.

All of this being said, the action of this book with fast paced and interesting, definitely leaving no dull moment when danger is near. Eric also proves himself to be a headstrong character with lofty, ambitious goals. Also, as a fan of Norse mythology, I enjoyed the references made that acted as a moving device throughout the plot.

Rating: 2 stars

I received a copy of Eric Olafson, Space Pirate from the publishing company Inkitt in exchange for an honest review.

 

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